Wednesday, May 02, 2012

It Ain’t Over Until It’s Over.


This is along the line of the jest and spirit of the saying “It’s not over until the fat lady sings.” But there is one thing certain about operas, viz., they may be rather long but endings they infallibly have. Sad to say, it is neither the matter nor the reality about the infamous Hacienda Luisita. The Supreme Court has clearly and loudly spoken. But will Malacañang listen and act accordingly? The highest body in the Judicial Branch of government has issued a definite and defining decision. But will the Chief Executive accept and implement the final and executor judgment?

Another way of putting it goes this way: Can it be realistically presumed that no less than the Commander-in-Chief as a party with huge family interests in the issue, would willingly and readily act on the verdict rendered on the Hacienda Luisita Case? Is it reasonable to assume that the same Chief-in-Command – who is nothing less than an heir of the Hacienda Luisita immense assets and immense profits – would heartily and gallantly comply with the sentence officially rendered on the Case? And can it be reasonably taken for granted that DAR – that remains under the patronage and shadow of Malacañang no matter all arguments to the contrary – would eagerly and faithfully act on the judicial pronouncement made on Hacienda?

Many Hacienda Luisita farmers were gunned down in Mendiola. Some Hacienda Luisita workers and sympathizers were murdered in Taclac. Are those responsible for this inhumanity already brought to justice?

So much wealth has been and still being generated by Hacienda deals in terms of huge land sales, of a big business hub, not to mention the so-called SCTEX. Would all these be simply relinquished just like that?

Someone who is with his peers dared decide on the issue about the Hacienda Luisita in favor of the farmers. Now, he is undergoing an Impeachment Trial – with the full backing Malacañang. Is it logical to think that he would be altogether acquitted?

The farmers concerned have all the reasons to rejoice with the last and latest decision of the Supreme Court on the Hacienda question of long standing. They have kept their ground. They suffered loses in the ranks. They have continued the crusade. They have won their fight. They have cause to cheer, to laugh, to jump for joy. But, truth to tell:

It ain’t over until it’s over.