Friday, August 26, 2011

PPP

ONCE again—with feeling.

There was this recent disappearing act of no less that the President of the Republic: It was called a “visit”. It was done “abroad”. It was held “secret” in nature and objective. Thus it came to pass that there was a time when the country had a President who could be then rightfully considered “missing” by the People of the Philippines—until the rare phenomenon was eventually brought to their attention. The cat is out of the bag. The issue is big. The implication is profound.

Briefly said, true or false, the distinct occasion brought to fore a distinct concern about the distinct matter of a “sub-State” in Mindanao—or something the like. The reactions were serious and immediate. Those indirectly concerned registered their reservations. Those directly concerned came up with their own convictions. Thus came to pass the huge and shrieking headline of a well known national daily echoing the choice occasioned by the said “visit”. In other words, some kind of an alternative was given to the Malacañang occupant: “Popularity or Peace”. Translation: Disregard the establishment of the “sub-State” and remain “popular”. See to it the “sub-State” becomes a reality and “peace” would be the fruit thereof.

Because of the perceived imprudent if not futile choice between “popularity” or “peace”, there are those who added another factor in the event that neither popularity nor peace come to fore, viz., “pity” on the Presidency. Thus it is that the PPP acquired another version. This: “Popularity or Peace or Pity”. Wherefore as of this time, PPP does not only mean “Private Public Partnership”. Neither does it stand only for “Poor Pilipino People”. Nor does it simply say “Pals. Pistols. Porche.” There is the newly added trio as above cited which is certainly anything but pleasant or deferential. What could the additional PPP—“Popularity or Peace or Pity”—mean in practical life?

One, how could someone be popular when he causes strife? Two, how could the same be the cause of peace when he is unpopular? Three, how could the same be not pitiful when he neither remains popular nor bring about peace?

In other words, the “visit” made “abroad” on a “secret” agenda, appears to be anything but promising—another “P”.


OVCRUZ, JCD
26 August 2011